can’t see the forest

Hans Bethe: The Retirement Years

Posted in Education, Physics, quantum mechanics, Science by Curtis on 11/7/06

Cornell University’s Hans Bethe tribute site provides QuickTime video of a series of lectures on the history and the critical issues of quantum theory which were in 1999 given by the professor to an audience of his neighbors at the Kendal of Ithaca retirement community. These videos are invaluable not only for their obvious historical worth, but for the unique, intimate, and not-too-mathematical account of the development and application of quantum research given by this distinguished pioneer in the field.

Hans Bethe (1906-2005) was a German-American physicist. He came to the United States in 1935, joining the faculty of Cornell University where his students included Richard Feynman. Bethe served as head of the theoretical physics division of the Manhattan Project, later becoming an adamant opponent of the arms race. In 1967 he won the Nobel Prize for Physics for work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis—basically a model of how stars ‘work.’

In 2004, Bethe signed a letter endorsing Sen. John Kerry for President and decrying George W. Bush’s ‘misuse of science.’

This is a fabulous introduction to quantum mechanics suitable both for the serious physics student and the layman (like me). Enjoy!

Advertisements

One Response

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Sophia said, on 11/15/06 at 9:29 am

    Thank you for the link. I was discussing quantum physics recently with my son and he is very much interested and I could not provide him with all the information.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: